Patricia Raskin

Patricia Raskin

host of the Patricia Raskin Positive Living radio show, is a nationally recognized, multi-media radio talk show host, award-winning producer, speaker and author.

steve_king_Tune is as Patricia interviews Steve King,  Executive Director for UnitedHealthcare in Providence. With baby boomers aging in to Medicare this year at a rate of 10,000 a day, the Medicare population - and those in need of clear, easy-to-understand information about the program - will swell tremendously in the coming decades. King will discuss eligibility and the basics of the Medicare program, including and overview of Medicare, health reform in Medicare, how baby-boomers will change Medicare and Medicare in your Pocketbook.

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vincent_indegliaTune in for the "Employment Success" featured segment when Patricia interviews Vincent Indeglia Esq., President of American Labor Services, Inc., Southern New England's largest privately held temporary employment agency specializing in providing blue collar, skilled and semi-skilled labor for small, medium and large businesses. American Labor Services, Inc. is the only temporary employment agency which specializes in solely servicing the manual labor needs of its customers.  He will discuss how to find the right labor and qualified personnel you need for long term or short term assignments. www.americanlaborservices.com

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brian_bensonJoin Patricia as she interviews Brian Benson, award-winning author and filmmaker, speaker, actor, musician, entrepreneur, workshop facilitator, finisher of over 50 triathlons (including 4 Ironman distance races), cross-country bicyclist, inspirational poet and committed advocate of helping others be the best that they can be.  He will discuss his book 'Brian's List' and the process of leaving a secure business to follow his intuition and heart during which time he has written 5 books and produced an award-winning movie short.

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vijay_vadTune in when Patricia interviews Dr. Vijay VAd, MD, a sports medicine specialist at New York's Hospital for Special Surgery, who is the former physician for the professional men's golf and tennis circuit. Dr. Vad is a believer in the power of the mind-body connection and regularly prescribes yoga exercises and other alternative strategies for his patients. He is also the author of the new book "Stop Pain: Inflammation Relief for an Active Life,'' which is packed with practical advice and self-care options to help chronic pain. He will discuss prevention of injuries in the workplace and what you can do to minimize dependence on narcotics or medical procedures for pain and injuries on the job.

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There are many books written about connection with others. Lyrics in songs talk about the power of relationships. Among the primary relationships we have with parents, spouses, significant others and children, relationships with friends and acquaintances can not be underestimated.

I have been blessed with many friends with whom I can share and enjoy. I recently had a friend over for dinner and noted how attentive she was to what I was saying. She stayed with my explanations and visibly showed her care and love. As she was leaving I thanked her more than once for being there for me, listening, caring and truly sharing in my joy.

I think that what I have just described is a gift. This kind of connection with others is so important and something most of us need and want. When we get derailed somewhere in our relationships, it's through our miscommunications, silence, not expressing our needs and feelings, not reaching out, and our fear of getting to close.

So how do we achieve this connectedness? Is it something we can actively look for and seek? I think we have to be it first. What I mean is that we have to know that we can have these connections, be open ourselves so that others will feel it and be drawn to us. The saying "birds of a feather, flock together" is an example of this.
Like attracts like. So if you seek rich and full relationships, connection with others you interact with on a daily basis or for the first time, then set that example out in the world.

In my book Pathfinding, my father tells this story about his powerful connection with a stranger who helped him:
"In the mid-30's when I was in college, jobs were hard to find. One summer I was lucky to get a Saturday morning job from 6:00 a.m. to noon unloading banana boats in Boston. My first assignment involved carrying what they called a stalk of bananas from the hold of the ship up vertical steps to the processing area offshore.

The stalks were trimmed into hands for the bananas to be packaged for shipping. The weight of each stalk varied from forty to eighty pounds. They hung from the ceiling of the ship's hold in rows. Each of us would wear a rubber shoulder apron and stand beneath the next stalk. The man standing there would cut the string holding the stalk and it would drop onto your shoulder. Then burdened with the heavy stalk, you'd walk up the stairs to the processing areas.

It was backbreaking work. But I'll never forget the time it was my luck, or misfortune, to stand under an oversized stalk. I had difficulty carrying that load up the steps. I didn't think I would make it. Suddenly, out of nowhere, a hand took me by the seat of my pants and pushed me up the ladder until I could gain my balance and carry the load to the processing room. When I turned around to see who had given me that wonderful helpful hand, I looked directly into the face of a huge African-American man. At the time he had pushed me up the ladder, he was carrying his own load. I'll never forget the kind look on his face. It taught me to appreciate kindness wherever and from whomever I find it."
Most of us are creatures of habit and don't like change. Change can be scary. But change is also a great opportunity for growth. When we have to make a change and do things differently, it doesn't feel good especially when we were comfortable with the way we were doing things before, even if it was not good for us.
Examples of this are having to change our eating habits, exercise routine, living environment, personal relationships, and the list goes on.

Here's what I have found personally about having to make changes that do not feel comfortable. It really makes me look at what is important to me and what is not. There are things about the change that I definitely like and want to keep, things about the change that make me evaluate what I have and how I have been doing things, and things that I definitely do not like and do not want to keep. It puts me right smack in the middle of myself, my true self, because it forces me to see that which I value and that which I can let go of.

I think that if we can see change as an opportunity to clarify our goals and dreams and values, then it is of great value to us, especially when we know that the change is necessary for personal, professional, financial or spiritual reasons. As we read about all the time, those who have made their dreams happen do it from trial and error and from making changes and risking to fail. We learn from our mistakes. That is not to say that change is easy. It isn't. It's much more comfortable to stay with what is familiar. The saying "the devil we know is better than the devil we don't" could be rephrased to "the devil we know is preventing us from the good we don't know yet."

How many people do you read about who have gone from failing relationships, jobs, health, and self-esteem to lives that are thriving? There are many. My advice on this is to give ourselves credit for the bold steps we take to break away from what is comfortable but not working in our lives.  We need to take baby steps and acknowledge each and every one of them. It's like climbing a mountain. If we look at the top from the bottom, the climb seems insurmountable. But if we take each step steadily, pause in the process and keep going, it's amazing how far we have come when we look back.

Acknowledgement of ourselves and our strengths is vital. The foundation is built upon our own self-esteem and worth. Without that, the foundation crumbles. We need to think things out, weigh possibilities and alternatives and foresee consequences.  Once we do that, we can make a clear decision based on the information we have now - not tomorrow. Then we can proceed without looking back.

Seven Media interview Tips:

  • Have a clear message that is easy for to understand.
  • Be enthusiastic and passionate about your message.
  • Prepare for the interview and rehearse.
  • Develop effective sound bites – getting your message across in a couple of sentences.
  • Learn how to turn negative questions into positive answers.
  • Know the controversial questions and have answers ready.
  • Know something about the interviewer's style – if it is a media interview- watch or listen to other programs.
  • Research internet radio networks.
  • Choose the one that represents the type of work and message you deliver.
  • Take advantage of host training or hire a radio coach.
  • Determine if you will do interviews and the type of guests you want.
  • Have guest information with questions ready for the interview.
  • Send your guests a promotional announcement before the interview.
  • Send the link of the recorded show to your guest.

Seven Media interview Tips:

  • Have a clear message that is easy for to understand.
  • Be enthusiastic and passionate about your message.
  • Prepare for the interview and rehearse.
  • Develop effective sound bites – getting your message across in a couple of sentences
  • Learn how to turn negative questions into positive answers.
  • Know the controversial questions and have answers ready.
  • Know something about the interviewer's style – if it is a media interview, watch or listen to other programs.

 

...Be a Radio Host
  • For broadcast radio, research the stations in your area.
  • Most stations require a fee for air-time, determine that fee up front.
  • Meet with the program director and sales director.
  • Determine how much time you have for commercials that you can sell or use for your own promotion.
  • Be familiar with the clock of the station so that you know exactly the times and number of minutes for the interview, commercials and breaks.
  • Prepare your introduction and close and content for your show.    
  • Determine how much promotion the station will provide for you when you are not on the air.

 

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